Author

Ethan Buckner

Class Year

2013

Access Type

Open Access

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department or Program

Independent Program

First Advisor

Carlos Alamo

Second Advisor

Lawrence Mamiya

Abstract

There are currently over 3 million people locked behind bars in United States prisons, jails, and detention centers. In this era of mass incarceration, prison abolitionists envision a world entirely without prisons. The politics of abolition are complex, and the vision for abolition is long-­‐term. Activists seeking to operationalize abolitionist politics must navigate pragmatic strategic questions of issue framing, leadership, campaign planning, and coalition building. This thesis addresses issues of abolitionist strategy by examining the work of the California Prison Moratorium Project, a small yet highly successful antiprison organization based in Fresno, at the heart of the San Joaquin Valley. Drawing from a short series of interviews with CPMP staff, advisory board members, and allies, along with news clippings, organizational publications, and scholarly research, I analyze the effectiveness of CPMP’s campaigns. Ultimately, I argue that CPMP’s broad-­‐based coalition building strategies are a powerful example of effective abolitionist organizing.

Share

COinS